Humane Education


“The boys may throw stones at the frogs in jest, but the frogs die in earnest.”

~ Plutarch


 

Voice For The Animals Foundation’s Humane Education Program teaches empathy, compassion and non-violence to students in schools in the Los Angeles area. 

 The goal of our Humane Education Program is to sensitize young people to animal issues and to nurture their potential for compassion towards those sentient beings who are considered “subhuman.” Although the educational system offers humane education courses at the elementary level, very few opportunities for humane education exist at the secondary level. Since adolescence is the time when young people stop seeing themselves as “children” and begin to see themselves as “adults,” it is imperative that, during this developmental period, they do not begin to associate the animal-abusive aspects of adult culture with “growing up”.

 What is Humane Education?

  • Humane education covers a variety of topics, ranging from human interaction with wildlife, mankind's treatment of domestic animals, and animals' place in the overall environment. Through the implementation of humane education courses, we hope to disrupt the cycle of animal and human abuse by decreasing a child's potential to be abusive or neglectful toward animals and, therein, promoting pro-social behavior toward humans.
  • Humane education programs seek to prevent violence by teaching empathy, compassion, and respect for all living beings and helping children develop into caring, responsible citizens.

Why is Humane Education Important?

  • Numerous academic studies have established a correlation between animal cruelty during childhood and interpersonal violence in adulthood.
  • A 2001-2004 study by the Chicago Police Department "revealed a startling propensity for offenders charged with crimes against animals to commit other violent offenses toward human victims."  The results of the study revealed that 65% of the people arrested for animal crimes had also been arrested for battery against another person.
  • A separate study focused on 36 convicted murderers. Of the 36 convicted multiple murderers questioned for the study, 46% admitted committing acts of animal torture as adolescents.
  • Researchers have found that between 71% and 83% of women staying in domestic violence shelters reported that their abusers also harmed or killed the family pet.
  • Children's lack of exposure to information regarding the role animals have in the economy of nature and in people's lives contributes to an increase in the number of wild and domestic animals that are subject to cruelty, abandonment, high animal shelter euthanasia rates, and, in extreme circumstances, extinction.   

 


 

Photos from Past Humane Education Presentations 

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Educational Videos

  

"The Truth About Pet Homelessness"

"Orangutans vs. The Palm Oil Industry"

 


  

Featured Content

"The Plight of Marine Mammals"

An interview with rescuer Peter Wallerstein

"TESTIMONIALS FROM NEW ROADS STUDENTS"

Testimonials from New Roads middle school students attending the animal rights course.

"WORKING AT THE ROOTS"

The above link is taken from a speech in 1884 to a national meeting of state school superintendents by George Angell, founder of the Massachusetts SPCA

"THE ANIMAL RIGHTS MOVEMENT AND THE FATE OF MODERN MAN"

Interview given by Evris Tsakirides to Athanasios Papatzimas, a Greek magazine in July 2008. Evris was a teacher at Crossroads High School and he founded HARP: Human Animal Relation Project

Puppet Show : "Please Take Care of Me" 

The puppeteers are: Minoo Rahbar, Jim Peace, and the actor is JR Nutt. The puppet show is the story of Robert (JR Nutt) who visits his friend Heather (puppeteer Minoo Rahbar) to tell her that he has a new doggie named Sofie. Heather finds out that Robert's parents won't let the dog inside the house. As the show unfolds, Sofie and Heather and Midnight (a cat puppet worked by Jim Peace) explain to Robert all the things one must do to properly take care of cats and dogs.

CHECK IT OUT HERE!

  


Click here to view a sample course outline! 


 

In Their Own Words: Click here for Humane Education Presentation Testimonials

 

 

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN HAVING A VFTA HUMANE EDUCATION PRESENTATION

OR SPONSORING A VFTA HUMANE EDUCATION PRESENTATION, CONTACT US: 
 You can reach us by contacting our Hotline (310) 392-5153 x1

Creating Compassion • Counteracting Cruelty